Breast Cancer Awareness Month: Why alcohol abuse is more dangerous for women

Every year, October is observed as the Breast Cancer Awareness Month in the United States with the objective of making people conscious about the need for early detection, palliative care and prevention strategies.

While age, obesity, genes and family history are some of the common causes of breast cancer, the International Agency for Research on Cancer considers alcohol as a carcinogenic substance. Every 10g or 1 drink of alcohol is associated with an increased risk of breast cancer by 7-10% among adult women. This link is prevalent in both premenopausal and postmenopausal women. The risk increases by 4-15% with even light alcohol intake (less than 1 drink/day). In America, nearly 4-10% cases of breast cancer are attributed to alcohol consumption leading to 9000 to 23,000 novel cases of breast cancer cases every year. Read more

Key hurdles confronting recovery patients after successful alcohol addiction treatment

Overcoming an alcohol addiction that has progressed to a diagnosable stage may seem like an insurmountable task for the individuals suffering from this problem. When alcohol addiction sets in, users exhibit the tendency to prioritize alcohol over everything else despite being aware of the repercussions on their health, career, relationships and life.

Moreover, people who have overcome the habit of drinking to the point of enduring abstinence, there are different sets of challenges. Therefore, they have an altogether a different story. In 2016, around 15.1 million Americans aged 12 or older were diagnosed with an alcohol use disorder (AUD). However, the majority of them do not receive adequate or any medical intervention. Read more